Archives for posts with tag: Nate Parker

The Ideological Content Analysis 30 Days Putsch:

30 Reviews in 30 Days

DAY FOUR

NonStop

Joel Silver, to his dying day, will never tire of trying to spook the goyim with terrorism. The immortal boogeyman of the twenty-first century rears its turbaned head again, only this time it is not the Muslims – or is it? – in Silver’s production Non-Stop, a decent vehicle for star Liam Neeson, who plays an air marshal aboard a transatlantic flight being threatened by an unusually inventive mystery terrorist. Until a turn for the stupid plunges it into irreparable turbulence, Non-Stop lives up to its title as a high-velocity thrill-flight, so that viewers are guaranteed at least a solid hour of Neesony excitement. Creepy Julianne Moore is also on board and somehow manages to get through the whole film without wrenching her face and sobbing.

[WARNING: SPOILERS]

4 out of 5 stars. Ideological Content Analysis indicates that Non-Stop is:

9. Civic-minded, performing a public service by informing unsuspecting men that womyn can be triggered by being called “ma’am”.

8. Pro-gay, normalizing homosexual marriage. An Archie Bunkerish cop (Corey Stoll) is flying to London because, he says, “My fairy brother’s getting married to a guy with a British accent.”

7. Drug-ambivalent. Neeson is an alcoholic whose drinking, however, seems not to have impaired the performance of his duty. His smoking habit, furthermore, serendipitously leads him to the discovery an important clue.

6. State-skeptical. A federal agent (Anson Mount) takes advantage of his position to smuggle cocaine.

5. Media-critical and anti-vigilante. Talking head critics of security state spending come across as uninformed nuisances. Also problematic is the trend of democratized reportage and instantly uploaded videos of purported misconduct by the authorities. Out-of-context phone footage of Neeson manhandling a passenger contributes to a false news narrative according to which Neeson himself is the terrorist. Passengers seeing these reports are misled into revolting against his questioned authority. Neither mainstream nor alternative media are helpful. Best to let the feds conduct their searches of persons and phone records unimpeded by citizen scrutiny and interference. (cf. no. 1)

4. Anti-racist. Cast against audience expectations, the token Arab (Omar Metwally) turns out not to be a terrorist, but – surprise, surprise! – a mild-mannered molecular neuroscientist. Educated brother Nate Parker, meanwhile, knows how to program and hack cell phones.

3. Police-ambivalent. Corey Stoll plays a New York City cop who, while basically a decent sort, is a bit of a bigot. “You’re gonna let that guy in the cockpit?” he objects, seeing Metwally being ushered into the front of the plane to assist in a medical emergency. Later, after having his broken nose set by the Arab, Stoll seems to have been humbled and made to understand something about the brotherhood of man. Police, Non-Stop says, need not be abolished or cannibalized like pigs in a blanket; they only need to be made more sensitive. On the other side of the equation, a mouthy and uncooperative black man (Corey Hawkins) gets off to a bad start with air marshal Neeson, but eventually takes his side and helps him to retrieve his pistol in a difficult situation. Non-Stop invites badged authorities and non-whites to try to meet halfway and engage in mutual understanding.

2. Anti-war. Terrorists Scoot McNairy and Nate Parker are ex-military men who see their service in the War on Terror as pointless. Implausibly, they are most upset by what they perceive as the unsatisfactory state of airline security in the wake of 9/11. “Security is this country’s biggest lie,” they fret. Rather than simply going online and discovering that the event was perpetrated by Jews, however, the duo concocts an elaborate terror scenario designed to frame an air marshal for their own outlandish crime. One can only assume the pair sustained head injuries on the battlefield. Non-Stop’s anti-war bona fides are, however, disingenuous in light of the following consideration.

1. Zionist, perpetuating the 9/11 myth. The circumstance of a flight from New York to London conflates the ghosts of the 7/7 and 9/11 attacks, which hang over the film and reinforce the mythology of the linked destinies of the United States and Britain in fighting the enemies of the Jews.

Rainer Chlodwig von Kook

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Red Tails poster

Exactly the trite, pedestrian, chest-swelling exercise one would expect it to be, this George Lucas production is just another entry in the unending cycle of films spotlighting Congoid-American achievement. These movies are always the same: mighty blacks encounter and overcome race-based adversity . . . sweeping, inspiring music soars . . . The End. This time the Hollywoodized achievers are the Tuskegee airmen, the first black aviators allowed to participate in combat – in this case, appropriately enough, against those immortal bogeybots and inhuman emblems of racism, the Nazis, who, of course, are in for a “good ol’ Georgia ass-whoopin’” when they encounter the Red Tails. These valiant warriors have not only to defeat the Germans, however, but must also vanquish racism on their own side.

Bryan Cranston, slumming in a thankless cameo, plays the military bureaucrat unwilling to give the brothers a chance. Cuba Gooding turns in a puzzlingly deadpan and colorless performance as Major Stance, and Terrence Howard is safely poker-faced as Colonel Bullard. Whether the other actors in the film are capable of much is hard to say, considering the humdrum (nonde)script with which they have to work. “War is Hell. What we’re doin’ is just boring as Hell,” one of the pilots remarks with candor. Red Tails is the sort of movie that will have viewers glancing at the clock fifty minutes in and groaning that the film, far from winding down for a landing, is flabbergastingly not even half-over yet!

There are, of course, the obligatory scenes in which black romantic prowess receives its due and in which central character Lightning (David Oyelowo) enters an officers’ club, the piano abruptly falls silent, and one of the evil bigots tells him, “This is a whites only officers club. You’re off the reservation, pal.” Most obnoxious, however, is the constant glorification of war and particularly of “killin’ Jerries”. Only genocidal blacks and the most self-loathing whites will exult in the flippant depiction of so much joy in human desolation. There is, too, an indication that the Red Tails take special delight in shooting down white fighters when one alludes to a German’s “bright yellow nose”, a suggestive reference not only to his plane’s paint job but also his lack of melanin. After so many computer-generated explosions and social triumphs, however, the viewer may not find himself stirred to multicultural pride by this cinematic backfire, so much as grumpily in tune with the unwelcoming white officer in the club who dismisses Lightning, saying, “Hey. Go home,” and throws in a racial slur for good measure.

2 stars. Ideological Content Analysis points Red Tails toward the hatefully segregated Crap Only facilities and indicates that this film is:

7. Pro-miscegenation. An Italian ditz (Daniela Ruah) blows a kiss to Lightning, who then woos her for the remainder of the film.

6. Ostensibly Christian. Smokey (Ne-Yo) carries a picture of “Black Jesus.” Whether this is simply to indicate that the historical Jesus was black or is instead a satirical jab at segregation, under which blacks require not only separate facilities, but also a deity of their own, only Black Jesus can say for certain. Not all of the pilots believe in the supernatural, however. (cf. no. 1)

5. Drug-ambivalent. Easy (Nate Parker) has a drinking problem. Smoking, however, gets a free pass, with Cuba Gooding working a pipe in picture 1940s style. Lightning smokes a cigar and Smokey appears to chew tobacco.

4. Statist. “You signed up to follow orders.”

3. Anti-racist and egalitarian. Skeptical whites are repeatedly forced to come to terms with the ability of blacks and say things like, “I guess there’s more to you coloreds than I thought.” The separate but equal doctrine extends to the military and receives a critique from Colonel Bullard, who, lobbying for more expensive equipment, says, “No more hand-me-downs. If you get us new planes, we can help your boys.”

2. Pro-war. The mutual mass murder politely termed war is as usual a noble enterprise, particularly when directed against unprogressive white men and when it serves as a vehicle for civil rights at home. The war effort even receives a spiritual endorsement: “Black Jesus, we thank you for bringing Red Squadron back home to us.”

1. Black supremacist. “We are on the side of God Almighty,” Red Tails boasts. “Hallelujah, the saints are marchin’ in,” proclaims one Red Tail as he enters the fray.

A very impressive debut feature from Nicholas Jarecki, Arbitrage makes the world of high financial malfeasance seemingly more accessible by examining its workings at the personal and intimate level of one man’s life.  Richard Gere, in a career highlight turn, anchors the film as troubled hedge fund magnate Robert Miller [sic. “Can someone please tell Hollywood there hasn’t been a WASP on Wall St for 30 years?” – @AnnCoulter, December 2, 2013].  Miller is an expert at projecting confidence and has built a fortune on the basis of the trust people have invested in him; but, just as financial activity is largely a matter of trade in illusions, so Miller’s personal as well as his professional life is not so secure as it might appear from outside.  When he loses control of his car and pulls a Chappaquiddick with unlucky French mistress Julie (Laetitia Casta) on a deserted road, the ensuing police investigation, led by Detective Bryer (Tim Roth), threatens a run on his relationships with his partners, investors, his wife (Susan Sarandon), and daughter (Brit Marling).

Finding himself in a major pickle, Miller enlists the help of Jimmy (Nate Parker), the black son of a former chauffeur, and sets in motion a cycle of lies that endanger not only his own security, but the well-being of every other person whose life intersects with Miller’s.  His family situation could disintegrate if the truth of his doings and dealings came out; also at stake are the stockholders who depend on Miller for the good stewardship of their wealth.  When Bryer targets Jimmy as a means to nailing his principal quarry, Miller places Jimmy in the unenviable position of being expected to sacrifice himself, potentially going to prison, for an irresponsible billionaire who may only view Jimmy as an expendable variation on the sacrificial Negro.

Though Miller continues to behave reprehensibly throughout the remainder of Arbitrage, the remarkable thing is that he never ceases to be a compelling and pitiable character.  In action, he is a fascinating man to observe, and his professional dealings display a talent and  admirable charisma that make the audience want him to succeed in bringing some order back into his life.  Gere, so handsome and seemingly serene, is the perfect actor to play Robert Miller and creates a wonderful interpretation.  Susan Sarandon is typically great, particularly in one powerful scene in the denouement.  That her character is absent for most of the film is in keeping with Miller’s experience (in consideration of how he neglects her), but increased screen time for Sarandon would be nice.  Marling and Casta, too, are fine and affecting in their supporting roles.  Jimmy, as written, is never an entirely convincing character, which is not the fault of Parker; but he does serve interesting ends for the story.  Tim Roth, naturally, is diverting in his adversarial role.

Tense and filled with devilishly uncomfortable moments, Arbitrage is very recommendable, affording a rare and human glimpse into a closed society.  Ideological Content Analysis indicates that Arbitrage is:

6. Anti-drug.  Julie turns to cocaine for distraction after romantic disappointment.

5. Anti-slut.  Julie, though depicted sympathetically, must be punished for the harlot’s part she plays in potentially wrecking Miller’s home, and so dies in decidedly unglamorous fashion in a wreck of her own.

4. Diversity-skeptical.  That Miller’s chosen accomplice, Jimmy, is a young black man from Harlem is a circumstance that complicates and darkens their relationship, partly because Jimmy’s father was one of Miller’s servants.  Jimmy is sensitive on the subject of his ambiguous, mostly business, but possibly also partly sentimental position relative to his father’s employer.  His blackness makes him an easy target for prosecution.

3. Class-conscious.  Detective Bryer resents the special treatment “rich assholes” like Miller receive in the legal system and demonstrates an unwise zeal in his effort to incriminate him in Julie’s death.

2. State-skeptical.  Police falsify evidence.  Statist economic intervention and nationalization of industry in Russia distorts market processes and, while seeming at first to be a boon for Miller, is ultimately the cause of his financial woes.

1. Capital-skeptical.  Though not an anti-capitalist film, Arbitrage knows its subject too well not to concede the vile, illusory nature of much of high finance.  Those who suffer the most from such malfeasance are seldom the authors of the crimes.

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