Anthony Summers, on page 160 of his book Official and Confidential: The Secret Life of J. Edgar Hoover, relates this amusing anecdote about the meticulous scrutiny the FBI director devoted to representations of the Bureau in popular entertainment – while, of course, ignoring the rise and reign of organized crime in the U.S.:

HooverEdgar was suddenly the hero of 1947. His face, framed by the Stars and Stripes, stared from the cover of Newsweek, telling the nation “How to Fight Communism.” He was being taken seriously, and taking himself much too seriously.

[…] Edgar learned that Love for Three Oranges, the theme tune for two films and a radio show about the FBI, had been written by the Soviet composer Sergei Prokofiev. “We ought to be able to utilize music by someone other than a well-known Communist,” Edgar scrawled on a memorandum. “Please get together on this, and quickly.” Aides scrambled to oblige, solemnly probing Prokofiev’s background and holding high-level conferences. There is not a glimmer of a sign that anyone realized how silly it all was.

Rainer Chlodwig von Kook

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