I’m impressed with Andrew Garfield, who has exactly the geeky charm and wiry physique I remember Spidey having in the Marvel comic books.  The action sequences in this franchise reboot are adequate, but the Lizard, though played capably in human form by Rhys Ifans, is never quite convincing in full computerized mutation.  For the most part, though, The Amazing Spider-Man is as fun and exciting as might be hoped.  The casting of Martin Sheen and Sally Field as Uncle Ben and Aunt May is inspired, and a 2012 Miniskirt Queen of Aryan Purity Award goes to Emma Stone as irresistibly cute love interest Gwen Stacy.  Denis Leary, meanwhile, seems to have made a graceful transition to playing grumpy, older authority figures.  4 of 5 stars.

The Amazing Spider-Man is mostly politics-free fun.  Ideological Content Analysis, however, indicates that this film is:

7. Multiculturalist.  A diverse team of crane operators helps Spidey at the end.  Also, we learn that his famous mask was in fact inspired by a Mexican luchador’s.

6. Antiwar.  An executive at the unscrupulous Oscorp, which is an arms manufacturer in addition to its medical interests, intends to utilize a veterans’ hospital’s patients as guinea pigs for limb regeneration experiments – a reminder of the many mutilated bodies coming back from Afghanistan and Iraq.

5. Persistent in perpetuating the idea that angry white males pose a terrorist threat.

4. Anti-gun.  Guns, even when employed responsibly by police (which is not usually the case in this film), are ineffective.  One innocent character dies from a gunshot.

3. Genetic research-ambivalent.

2. Pro-vigilante/anti-police.

1. Leftist.  Uncle Ben, explaining to Peter his absent father’s moral philosophy, sums it up as, “Not choice – responsibility,” which captures the liberal mentality in a nutshell.

This has been a public service announcement of the Committee for Raising Emma Stone to a Pedestal for a Better View.

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